Zapier CLI Reference

These are the generated docs for all Zapier platform CLI commands.

You can install the CLI with npm install -g zapier-platform-cli.

$ npm install -g zapier-platform-cli

Commands

analytics

Show the status of the analytics that are collected. Also used to change what is collected.

Usage: zapier analytics

Flags

  • -m, --mode Choose how much information to share. Anonymous mode drops the OS type and Zapier user id, but keeps command info. Identifying information is used only for debugging purposes. One of [enabled | anonymous | disabled].
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier analytics --mode enabled

build

Build a pushable zip from the current directory.

Usage: zapier build

This command does the following:

  • Creates a temporary folder

  • Copies all code into the temporary folder

  • Adds an entry point: zapierwrapper.js

  • Generates and validates app definition.

  • Detects dependencies via browserify (optional, on by default)

  • Zips up all needed .js files. If you want to include more files, add a “includeInBuild” property (array with strings of regexp paths) to your .zapierapprc.

  • Moves the zip to build/build.zip and build/source.zip and deletes the temp folder

This command is typically followed by zapier upload.

Flags

  • --disable-dependency-detection Disable “smart” file inclusion. By default, Zapier only includes files that are required by index.js. If you (or your dependencies) require files dynamically (such as with require(someVar)), then you may see “Cannot find module” errors. Disabling this may make your build.zip too large. If that’s the case, try using the includeInBuild option in your .zapierapprc. See the docs about includeInBuild for more info.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

convert

Convert a Legacy Web Builder app or Visual Builder integration to a CLI integration.

Usage: zapier convert INTEGRATIONID PATH

If you’re converting a Legacy Web Builder app: the new integration will have a dependency named zapier-platform-legacy-scripting-runner, a shim used to simulate behaviors that are specific to Legacy Web Builder. There could be differences on how the shim simulates and how Legacy Web Builder actually behaves on some edge cases, especially you have custom scripting code.

If you’re converting a Visual Builder app, then it will be identical and ready to push and use immediately!

If you re-run this command on an existing directory it will leave existing files alone and not clobber them.

You’ll need to do a zapier push before the new version is visible in the editor, but otherwise you’re good to go.

Arguments

  • (required) integrationId To get the integration/app ID, go to “https://zapier.com/app/developer”, click on an integration, and copy the number directly after “/app/” in the URL.
  • (required) path Relative to your current path - IE: . for current directory.

Flags

  • -v, --version Convert a specific version. Required when converting a Visual Builder integration.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

delete:integration

Delete your integration (including all versions).

Usage: zapier delete:integration

This only works if there are no active users or Zaps on any version. If you only want to delete certain versions, use the zapier delete:version command instead. It’s unlikely that you’ll be able to run this on an app that you’ve pushed publicly, since there are usually still users.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • delete:app

delete:version

Delete a specific version of your integration.

Usage: zapier delete:version VERSION

This only works if there are no users or Zaps on that version. You will probably need to have run zapier migrate and zapier deprecate before this command will work.

Arguments

  • (required) version Specify the version to delete. It must have no users or Zaps.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

deprecate

Mark a non-production version of your integration as deprecated, with removal by a certain date.

Usage: zapier deprecate VERSION DATE

Use this when an integration version will not be supported or start breaking at a known date.

Zapier will send an email warning users of the deprecation once a date is set, they’ll start seeing it as “Deprecated” in the UI, and once the deprecation date arrives, if the Zaps weren’t updated, they’ll be paused and the users will be emailed again explaining what happened.

After the deprecation date has passed it will be safe to delete that integration version.

Do not use this if you have non-breaking changes, such as fixing help text.

Arguments

  • (required) version The version to deprecate.
  • (required) date The date (YYYY-MM-DD) when Zapier will make the specified version unavailable.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier deprecate 1.2.3 2011-10-01

describe

Describe the current integraiton.

Usage: zapier describe

This command prints a human readable enumeration of your integrations’s

triggers, searches, and creates as seen by Zapier. Useful to understand how your

resources convert and relate to different actions.

  • Noun: your action’s noun

  • Label: your action’s label

  • Resource: the resource (if any) this action is tied to

  • Available Methods: testable methods for this action

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

env:get

Get environment variables for a version.

Usage: zapier env:get VERSION

Arguments

  • (required) version The version to get the environment for.

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier env:get 1.2.3

env:set

Set environment variables for a version.

Usage: zapier env:set VERSION [KEY-VALUE PAIRS...]

Arguments

  • (required) version The version to set the environment for. Values are copied forward when a new version is created, but this command will only ever affect the specified version.
  • key-value pairs... The key-value pairs to set. Keys are case-insensitive. Each pair should be space separated and pairs should be separated by an =. For example: A=123 B=456

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier env:set 1.2.3 SECRET=12345 OTHER=4321

env:unset

Unset environment variables for a version.

Usage: zapier env:unset VERSION [KEYS...]

Arguments

  • (required) version The version to set the environment for.
  • keys... The keys to unset. Keys are case-insensitive.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier env:unset 1.2.3 SECRET OTHER

history

Get the history of your integration.

Usage: zapier history

History includes all the changes made over the lifetime of your integration. This includes everything from creation, updates, migrations, admins, and invitee changes, as well as who made the change and when.

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

integrations

List integrations you have admin access to.

Usage: zapier integrations

This command also checks the current directory for a linked integration.

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • apps

Link the current directory with an existing integration.

Usage: zapier link

This command generates a .zapierapprc file in the directory in which it’s ran. This file ties this code to an integration and is referenced frequently during push and validate operations. This file should be checked into source control.

If you’re starting an integration from scratch, use zapier init instead.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

login

Configure your ~/.zapierrc with a deploy key.

Usage: zapier login

Flags

  • -s, --sso Use this flag if you log into Zapier a Single Sign-On (SSO) button and don’t have a Zapier password.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

logout

Deactivate your active deploy key and reset ~/.zapierrc.

Usage: zapier logout

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

logs

Print recent logs.

Usage: zapier logs

Logs are created when your integration is run as part of a Zap. They come from explicit calls to z.console.log(), usage of z.request(), and any runtime errors.

This won’t show logs from running locally with zapier test, since those never hit our server.

Flags

  • -v, --version Filter logs to the specified version.
  • -s, --status Filter logs to only see errors or successes One of [any | success | error]. Defaults to any.
  • -t, --type See logs of the specified type One of [console | bundle | http]. Defaults to console.
  • --detailed See extra info, like request/response body and headers.
  • -u, --user Only show logs for this user. Defaults to your account. Defaults to me.
  • --limit Cap the number of logs returned. Max is 50 (also the default) Defaults to 50.
  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

migrate

Migrate users from one version of your integration to another.

Usage: zapier migrate FROMVERSION TOVERSION [PERCENT]

Start a migration to move users between different versions of your integration. You may also “revert” by simply swapping the from/to verion strings in the command line arguments (i.e. zapier migrate 1.0.1 1.0.0).

Only use this command to migrate users between non-breaking versions, use zapier deprecate if you have breaking changes!

Migration time varies based on the number of affected Zaps. Be patient and check zapier history to track the status.

Since a migration is only for non-breaking changes, users are not emailed about the update/migration. It will be a transparent process for them.

We recommend migrating a small subset of users first, then watching error logs of the new version for any sort of odd behavior. When you feel confident there are no bugs, go ahead and migrate everyone. If you see unexpected errors, you can revert.

You can migrate a single user by using --user (i.e. zapier migrate 1.0.0 1.0.1 --user=user@example.com).

Arguments

  • (required) fromVersion The version FROM which to migrate users.
  • (required) toVersion The version TO which to migrate users.
  • percent Percentage (between 1 and 100) of users to migrate.

Flags

  • --user Migrate only this user
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier migrate 1.0.0 1.0.1
  • zapier migrate 1.0.1 2.0.0 10
  • zapier migrate 2.0.0 2.0.1 --user=user@example.com

promote

Promote a specific version to public access.

Usage: zapier promote VERSION

Promote an integration version into production (non-private) rotation, which means new users can use this integration version.

  • This does mark the version as the official public version - all other versions & users are grandfathered.

  • This does NOT build/upload or deploy a version to Zapier - you should zapier push first.

  • This does NOT move old users over to this version - zapier migrate 1.0.0 1.0.1 does that.

  • This does NOT recommend old users stop using this version - zapier deprecate 1.0.0 2017-01-01 does that.

Promotes are an inherently safe operation for all existing users of your integration.

If your integration is private and passes our integration checks, this will give you a URL to a form where you can fill in additional information for your integration to go public. After reviewing, the Zapier team will approve to make it public if there are no issues or decline with feedback.

Arguments

  • (required) version The version you want promote.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier promote 1.0.0

push

Build and upload the current integration.

Usage: zapier push

This command is the same as running zapier build and zapier upload in sequence. See those for more info.

Flags

  • --disable-dependency-detection Disable “smart” file inclusion. By default, Zapier only includes files that are required by index.js. If you (or your dependencies) require files dynamically (such as with require(someVar)), then you may see “Cannot find module” errors. Disabling this may make your build.zip too large. If that’s the case, try using the includeInBuild option in your .zapierapprc. See the docs about includeInBuild for more info.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

register

Register a new integration in your account.

Usage: zapier register [TITLE]

After running this, you can run zapier push to build and upload your integration for use in the Zapier editor.

This will change the ./.zapierapprc (which identifies this directory as holding code for a specific integration).

Arguments

  • title Your integrations’s public title. Asked interactively if not present.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier register
  • zapier register "My Cool Integration"

scaffold

Add a starting trigger, create, search, or resource to your integration.

Usage: zapier scaffold ACTIONTYPE NOUN

The first argument should be one of trigger|search|create|resource followed by the noun that this will act on (something like “contact” or “deal”).

The scaffold command does two general things:

  • Creates a new file (such as triggers/contact.js)

  • Imports and registers it inside your index.js

You can mix and match several options to customize the created scaffold for your project.

Arguments

  • (required) actionType undefined
  • (required) noun undefined

Flags

  • -d, --dest Specify the new file’s directory. Use this flag when you want to create a different folder structure such as src/triggers instead of the default triggers. Defaults to [triggers|searches|creates]/{noun}.
  • --test-dest Specify the new test file’s directory. Use this flag when you want to create a different folder structure such as src/triggers instead of the default triggers. Defaults to test/[triggers|searches|creates]/{noun}.
  • -e, --entry Supply the path to your integration’s root (index.js). Only needed if your index.js is in a subfolder, like src. Defaults to index.js.
  • -f, --force Should we overwrite an exisiting trigger/search/create file?
  • --no-help When scaffolding, should we skip adding helpful intro comments? Useful if this isn’t your first rodeo.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier scaffold trigger contact
  • zapier scaffold search contact --dest=my_src/searches
  • zapier scaffold create contact --entry=src/index.js
  • zapier scaffold resource contact --force

team:add

Add a team member to your integration.

Usage: zapier team:add EMAIL ROLE [MESSAGE]

These users come in two levels:

  • admin, who can edit everything about the integration

  • subscriber, who can’t directly access the app, but will receive periodic email updates. These updates include quarterly health socores and more.

Team members can be freely added and removed.

Arguments

  • (required) email The user to be invited. If they don’t have a Zapier account, they’ll be prompted to create one.
  • (required) role The level the invited team member should be at. Admins can edit everything and get email updates. Subscribers only get email updates.
  • message A message sent in the email to your team member, if you need to provide context. Wrap the message in quotes to ensure spaces get saved.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier team:add bruce@wayne.com admin
  • zapier team:add alfred@wayne.com subscriber "Hey Alfred, check out this app."

Aliases

  • team:invite

team:get

Get team members involved with your integration.

Usage: zapier team:get

These users come in two levels:

  • admin, who can edit everything about the integration

  • subscriber, who can’t directly access the app, but will receive periodic email updates. These updates include quarterly health socores and more.

Use the zapier team:add and zapier team:remove commands to modify your team.

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • team:list

team:remove

Remove a team member from all versions of your integration.

Usage: zapier team:remove

Admins will immediately lose write access to the integration. Subscribers won’t receive future email updates.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • team:delete

test

Test your integration via npm test.

Usage: zapier test

This command is effectively the same as npm test, except we also validate your integration and set up the environment. We recommend using mocha as your testing framework.

Flags

  • -t, --timeout Set test-case timeout in milliseconds. Defaults to 2000.
  • --grep Only run tests matching pattern.
  • --skip-validate Forgo running zapier validate before npm test.
  • --yarn Use yarn instead of npm.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier test
  • zapier test -t 30000 --grep api --skip-validate

upload

Upload the latest build of your integration to Zapier.

Usage: zapier upload

This command sends both build/build.zip and build/source.zip to Zapier for use.

Typically we recommend using zapier push, which does a build and upload, rather than upload by itself.

Flags

  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

users:add

Add a user to some or all versions of your integration.

Usage: zapier users:add EMAIL [VERSION]

When this command is run, we’ll send an email to the user inviting them to try your integration. You can track the status of that invite using the zapier users:get command.

Invited users will be able to see your integration’s name, logo, and description. They’ll also be able to create Zaps using any available triggers and actions.

Arguments

  • (required) email The user to be invited. If they don’t have a Zapier account, they’ll be prompted to create one.
  • version A version string (like 1.2.3). Optional, used only if you want to invite a user to a specific version instead of all versions.

Flags

  • -f, --force Skip confirmation. Useful for running programatically.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier users:add bruce@wayne.com
  • zapier users:add alfred@wayne.com 1.2.3

Aliases

  • users:invite

users:get

Get a list of users who have been invited to your integration.

Usage: zapier users:get

Note that this list of users is NOT a comprehensive list of everyone who is using your integration. It only includes users who were invited directly by email (using the zapier users:add command or the web UI). Users who joined by clicking links generated using the zapier user:links command won’t show up here.

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • users:list

Get a list of links that are used to invite users to your integration.

Usage: zapier users:links

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

users:remove

Remove a user from all versions of your integration.

Usage: zapier users:remove EMAIL

When this command is run, their Zaps will immediately turn off. They won’t be able to use your app again until they’re re-invited or it has gone public. In practice, this command isn’t run often as it’s very disruptive to users.

Arguments

  • (required) email The user to be removed.

Flags

  • -f, --force Skips confirmation. Useful for running programatically.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Aliases

  • users:delete

validate

Validate your integration.

Usage: zapier validate

Run the standard validation routine powered by json-schema that checks your integration for any structural errors. This is the same routine that runs during zapier build, zapier upload, zapier push or even as a test in zapier test.

Flags

  • --without-style Forgo pinging the Zapier server to run further checks.
  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

Examples

  • zapier validate
  • zapier validate --without-style
  • zapier validate --format json

versions

List the versions of your integration available for use in the Zapier editor.

Usage: zapier versions

Flags

  • -f, --format Change the way structured data is presented. If “json” or “raw”, you can pipe the output of the command into other tools, such as jq. One of [plain | json | raw | row | table]. Defaults to table.
  • -d, --debug Show extra debugging output.

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